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Restore archived indexed data

Restore archived data by moving the archived bucket into your thawed directory, for example: $SPLUNK_HOME/var/lib/splunk/defaultdb/thaweddb. Data in thaweddb is not subject to the server's index aging scheme (hot > warm> cold > frozen). You can put archived data in the thawed directory for as long as you need it. When the data is no longer needed, simply delete it or move it out of thawed.

Important: You restore archived data differently depending on whether it was originally indexed in Splunk version 4.2 or later. This is because Splunk changed its rawdata format in 4.2.

See "Archive indexed data" for information on how to archive data in the first place. You can also use that page as guidance if you want to re-archive data after you've thawed it.

Restrictions when restoring an archive to a different instance of Splunk

For the most part, you can restore an archive to any instance of Splunk, not just the one that originally indexed it. This, however, depends on a couple of factors:

  • Splunk version. You cannot restore a bucket created by Splunk 4.2 or later to a pre-4.2 instance of Splunk. The bucket data format changed between 4.1 and 4.2, and pre-4.2 Splunk instances do not understand the new format. This means:
    • 4.2+ buckets: You can restore a 4.2+ bucket to any 4.2+ instance.
    • Pre-4.2 buckets: You can restore a pre-4.2 bucket to any Splunk instance, pre-4.2 or post-4.2, aside from a few OS-related issues, described in the next bullet.
  • OS version. You can usually restore buckets to a Splunk instance running on a different OS. Specifically:
    • 4.2+ buckets: You can restore a 4.2+ bucket to a Splunk instance running any operating system.
    • Pre-4.2 buckets: You can restore a pre-4.2 bucket to a Splunk instance running any operating system, with the restriction that you cannot restore pre-4.2 data to a system of different endian-ness. For example, data generated on 64-bit systems is not likely to work well on 32-bit systems, and data cannot be moved from PowerPC or Sparc systems to x86 or x86-64 systems, and vice versa.

In addition, make sure that you do not introduce bucket ID conflicts to your index when restoring the archived bucket. This issue is discussed later.

How to tell whether your archive bucket contains 4.2+ data

Before thawing the archive bucket, you need to identify whether the archive bucket is pre- or post-4.2. Here's how to tell the difference, assuming you archived the buckets using coldToFrozenDir or the provided example script:

  • 4.2+ bucket: The bucket directory contains only the rawdata directory, which contains journal.gz.
  • Pre-4.2 bucket: The bucket directory contains gzipped versions of .tsidx and .data files, along with a rawdata directory containing files named <int>.gz.

Important: If you archived the data through some script of your own, the resulting bucket could contain just about anything.

If you archived the buckets using coldToFrozenDir or the provided example script, you can use the following procedures to thaw them.

Thaw a 4.2+ archive

*nix users

Here is an example of safely restoring a 4.2+ archive bucket to thawed:

1. Copy your archive bucket to a temporary location in the thawed directory:

# cp -r db_1181756465_1162600547_0  $SPLUNK_HOME/var/lib/splunk/defaultdb/thaweddb/temp_db_1181756465_1162600547_0

2. Execute the rebuild command on the temporary bucket to rebuild the Splunk indexes and associated files:

# splunk rebuild $SPLUNK_HOME/var/lib/splunk/defaultdb/thaweddb/temp_db_1181756465_1162600547_0

3. Rename the temporary bucket to something that Splunk will recognize:

# cd $SPLUNK_HOME/var/lib/splunk/defaultdb/thaweddb/
# mv temp_db_1181756465_1162600547_0 db_1181756465_1162600547_1001

Note: You must choose a bucket id that does not conflict with any other bucket in the index. This example assumes that the bucket id '1001' is unique for the index. If it isn't, choose some other, non-conflicting bucket ID.

After moving the bucket into thaweddb, you should be able to search on rebuilt archived data.

Windows users

Here is an example of safely restoring a 4.2+ archive bucket to thawed:

1. Copy your archive bucket to the thawed directory:

> xcopy D:\MyArchive\db_1181756465_1162600547_0 %SPLUNK_HOME%\var\lib\splunk\defaultdb\thaweddb\temp_db_1181756465_1162600547_0 /s /e /v

2. Execute the rebuild command on the temporary bucket to rebuild the Splunk indexes and associated files:

> splunk rebuild %SPLUNK_HOME%\var\lib\splunk\defaultdb\thaweddb\temp_db_1181756465_1162600547_0

3. Rename the temporary bucket to something that Splunk will recognize:

> cd %SPLUNK_HOME%\var\lib\splunk\defaultdb\thaweddb
> move /Y temp_db_1181756465_1162600547_0 db_1181756465_1162600547_1001

Note: You must choose a bucket id that does not conflict with any other bucket in the index. This example assumes that the bucket id '1001' is unique for the index. If it isn't, choose some other, non-conflicting bucket ID.

After moving the bucket into thaweddb, you should be able to search on rebuilt archived data.

Thaw a pre-4.2 archive

*nix users

Here is an example of safely restoring a pre-4.2 archive bucket to thawed:

1. Copy your archive bucket to a temporary location in the thawed directory:

# cp -r db_1181756465_1162600547_0  $SPLUNK_HOME/var/lib/splunk/defaultdb/thaweddb/temp_db_1181756465_1162600547_0

2. If the bucket was compressed when originally archived, uncompress the contents in the thawed directory.

3. Rename the temporary bucket to something that Splunk will recognize:

# cd $SPLUNK_HOME/var/lib/splunk/defaultdb/thaweddb/
# mv temp_db_1181756465_1162600547_0 db_1181756465_1162600547_1001

Note: You must choose a bucket id that does not conflict with any other bucket in the index. This example assumes that the bucket id '1001' is unique for the index. If it isn't, choose some other, non-conflicting bucket ID.

4. Refresh the manifests:

# cd $SPLUNK_HOME/bin
# ./splunk login
# ./splunk _internal call /data/indexes/main/rebuild-metadata-and-manifests 

After a few moments, the contents of your newly thawed bucket should be searchable again.

Windows users

Here is an example of safely restoring a pre-4.2 archive bucket to thawed:

1. Copy your archive bucket to the thawed directory:

> xcopy D:\MyArchive\db_1181756465_1162600547_0 %SPLUNK_HOME%\var\lib\splunk\defaultdb\thaweddb\temp_db_1181756465_1162600547_0 /s /e /v

2. If the bucket was compressed when originally archived, uncompress the contents in the thawed directory.

3. Rename the temporary bucket to something that Splunk will recognize:

> cd %SPLUNK_HOME%\var\lib\splunk\defaultdb\thaweddb
> move /Y temp_db_1181756465_1162600547_0 db_1181756465_1162600547_1001

Note: You must choose a bucket id that does not conflict with any other bucket in the index. This example assumes that the bucket id '1001' is unique for the index. If it isn't, choose some other, non-conflicting bucket ID.

4. Refresh the manifests:

> cd %SPLUNK_HOME%\bin
> splunk login
> splunk _internal call /data/indexes/main/rebuild-metadata-and-manifests

After a few moments, the contents of your newly thawed bucket should be searchable again.

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This documentation applies to the following versions of Splunk® Enterprise: 4.3, 4.3.1, 4.3.2, 4.3.3, 4.3.4, 4.3.5, 4.3.6, 4.3.7


Comments

After reading this page, I tried to perform a restore of a frozen bucket (4.2) using the steps outlined above. I could not get the thawed bucket to index into Splunk until i finally realized I needed a restart. This may be obvious, but it was something which i noticed was not mentioned in the steps to restoring an frozen bucket.

Johndunlea
May 23, 2011

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