Splunk® Content Packs for ITSI and IT Essentials Work

Splunk Content Packs for ITSI and IT Essentials Work

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Dashboard reference for the Content Pack for VMware Dashboards and Reports

These dashboards are included in the Content Pack for VMware Dashboards and Reports. To navigate to the reports go to Dashboards > Dashboards ITSI or IT Essentials Work menu. The reports from Content Pack for VMware Dashboards and Reports are labeled with the App name "DA-ITSI-CP-vmware-dashboards".

Capacity Forecasting dashboard

Use capacity forecasting to predict resource usage for different entities in your environment. Predicted results are based on historical values. Using these predictions you can optimize your environment for peak performance and be prepared, in advance, to handle unexpected usage periods.

Using the Capacity Forecasting dashboard, you can:

  • Predict CPU usage over a specified time.
  • Predict memory usage over time.
  • Predict disk usage over time.
Screenshot of capacity forecasting dashboard.

Capacity Forecasting panel

Use the drop-down lists to filter your selection for charting predicted resource usage. You can:

  • Select a time range for the search using the Time Selector.
  • Select a specific virtual center in your environment.
  • Select all host systems managed by the virtual center or select a specific host system.
  • Select all virtual machines or select a specific virtual machine.
  • Set a prediction time. A value of "0" indicates current time. A value of "1" indicates that you want to predict resource usage for 1 "time unit" from now.
  • Select a time unit, for example, minutes, days, weeks, or months into the future.
  • Select a forecasting algorithm. The prediction algorithms are:
    • LLP-Seasonal local level - This is a univariate model with seasonality. The periodicity of the time series is automatically computed. It requires the minimum number of data points to be twice the period.
    • LL-Local level - This is a univariate model with no trends and no seasonality. It requires a minimum of 2 data points.
    • LLT-Local level trend - This is a univariate model with trend but no seasonality. It requires a minimum of 3 data points.

For more information on the forecasting algorithms used, see Predict in the Splunk Enterprise Search Reference manual.

The Capacity Forecasting dashboard charts predicted usage of a resource (cpu, memory, disk). In each of the charts on this dashboard, the lower and upper confidence interval parameters default to lower95 and upper95. This specifies a confidence interval where 95% of the predictions are expected to fall. The vmw:perf:* source type must be present for the panels to populate.

Panel Description
CPU Usage Prediction over Time (%) The chart displays predicted cpu usage for a host system, or all of the host systems in a virtual center over the time range specified. CPU usage prediction is calculated as a percent value using the "cpu.average.usage.percent" metric.
Average cpu usage (MHz) mem.average.usage.percent
Mem Usage Prediction over Time (%) The chart displays predicted memory usage for a host system, or all of the host systems in a virtual center over the time range specified. Memory usage prediction is calculated as a percent value using the "mem.average.usage.percent" metric.
Disk Usage Prediction over Time (KBs/sec) The chart displays predicted disk usage for a virtual machine or all the virtual machines in a virtual center over the time range specified. Disk Usage Prediction is calculated in KB/sec using the "disk.average.usage.kiloBytesPerSecond" metric.

Capacity Planning (Clusters) dashboard

Use the Capacity Planning (Clusters) dashboard to monitor and plan the allocation of resources for virtual machines in your cluster. Using this dashboard you can see memory and CPU utilization for specific clusters, and you can identify those clusters that are nearing maximum capacity for the specific resource. CPU utilization is expressed as a percentage of time (0 to 100%) that the CPU executes at the threshold you define.

You can also view a list of clusters excluded due to lack of hosts or services. These are clusters that do not support cluster services and that contain less than two hosts.

Screenshot of the capacity planning clusters dashboard

Cluster Performance

Filter your search results using the drop-down lists in the "Cluster Performance" panel. The data displayed in the table is populated with the results of the search. Using the results in the table, you can monitor the activity of certain clusters or better provision resource (CPU or memory) for them.

To show cluster performance, perform the following steps.

  1. Select a time range for the search (for example Last 24 hours).
  2. In the Show clusters with menu, select a key performance metric, max CPU usage or max memory usage, to base the search on (for example, max CPU usage).
  3. Define a usage percent for a resource (for example 80%).
  4. Specify whether you want the search to include results that are higher or lower than the percent specified. In this example, select or higher.
  5. Define a percentage of time over which the resource is used (for example 5%).

A table displays the clusters where CPU usage met or rose above 80% more than 5% of the time.

Click a cluster in the results table to display a chart showing the performance of the cluster in relation to the threshold you set for that metric.

The following metrics are used to populate the dashboard.

Name Metric Description
max cpu usage clusterServices.average.effectivecpu.megaHertz This is the ESXi host's average memory usage as a percent value.
max memory usage mem.average.usage.percent This is the ESXi host's average memory usage as a percent value.

Capacity Planning for Clusters - CPU Headroom dashboard

Use this dashboard to get an estimate for the number of virtual machines that you can add to the cluster based on current CPU consumption (of the ESXi hosts) and total CPU capacity allocated to virtual machines in the cluster. This dashboard reports only on powered-on virtual machines in the cluster.

The Capacity Planning for Clusters - CPU Headroom dashboard displays:

  • Capacity statistics for a cluster.
  • A list of powered-on virtual machines showing their cpu usage in the cluster.
  • A chart showing current cpu usage, safe cpu usage, and total cpu capacity for the cluster.

You can view a list of clusters excluded due to lack of hosts or services. These are clusters that don't support cluster services and that contain fewer than two hosts.

To display details for a specific cluster, select a time range and the cluster name from the Cluster drop-down list. Details for the cluster are displayed in the panels.

Screenshot of capacity planning for clusters - CPU Headroom dashboard.

Capacity statistics

In the Capacity statistics panel you can see:

  • The number of hosts in the cluster
  • The number of powered on virtual machines
  • Average CPU usage in (MHz) per virtual machine.
  • Total CPU usage MHz available in cluster
  • Estimated number of virtual machines that can be added to the cluster

Powered on virtual machines in the cluster

A table displays the powered on virtual machines in the cluster and the average and maximum cpu usage (in MHZ) for each virtual machine.

Currently used (MHz) and Total Capacity

A chart displays the total capacity of the cluster, the current cpu usage of the cluster, and safe usage over the time period specified.

Metrics used

The following metrics are used to calculate CPU utilization:

Name Metric
CPU usage for the cluster clusterServices.average.effectivecpu.megaHertz
Average cpu usage (MHz) mem.average.usage.percent
Maximum cpu usage (MHz) cpu.maximux.usagemhz.megaHertz
Minimum cpu usage (MHz) cpu.minimum.usagemhz.megaHertz

Capacity Planning for Clusters - Memory Headroom dashboard

Use this dashboard to get an estimate for the number of virtual machines that you can add to the cluster based on current memory consumption and overhead memory allocated to the virtual machines in the cluster. This dashboard reports only on powered-on virtual machines in the cluster.

Using the data on this dashboard you can make better resource provisions to minimize and resolve bottlenecks, increases the availability of systems and improve overall performance of the systems.

The Capacity Planning for Clusters - Memory Headroom dashboard displays:

  • Capacity statistics for the cluster.
  • A list of powered-on virtual machines showing their memory usage in the cluster.
  • A chart showing current memory usage (in GB) for the cluster, and total memory capacity for the cluster.

To display details for a specific cluster, select a time range and the cluster name from the Cluster drop-down list. The details for the cluster are displayed in the panels.

Screenshot of the Capacity Planning for Clusters dashboard.

Capacity statistics

The Capacity statistics panel shows information about:

  • The number of hosts in the cluster.
  • The number of powered-on virtual machines.
  • Average consumed memory (in GB) per virtual machine.
  • Average overhead memory usage (in GB) per virtual machine.
  • Total memory available in the cluster (in GB).
  • Estimated number of virtual machines that you can add to the cluster.

Powered on virtual machines memory usage in the cluster

The Powered on virtual machines memory usage in the cluster panel displays the memory usage for each powered-on virtual machines in the cluster. Virtual machine memory overhead is the amount of machine memory allocated to a virtual machine beyond its reserved amount. This table shows the average and maximum overhead usage (in GB) for each virtual machine.

  • AvgOverheadUsg_GB is the metric used to measure the memory used by VMware to actually power the virtual machine.
  • MaxOverheadUsg_GB is the metric used to measure the maximum memory used by VMware to actually power the virtual machine, over the summarization period.
  • AvgConsumedUsg_GB is the metric used to measure the average memory consumed by the virtual machine in the cluster.
  • MaxConsumedUsg_GB is the metric used to measure the maximum amount of memory consumed by a virtual machine over the summarization period.

Currently used (GB) and Total Capacity

A chart displays the total capacity of the cluster, the current CPU usage of the cluster, and safe usage over the time period specified.


Capacity Planning (Hosts) dashboard

Use the Capacity Planning (Hosts) dashboard to monitor and and plan the allocation of resources to hosts in your environment. This dashboard shows the performance of hosts over time based on the memory or CPU resources used. These resources are critical components of your virtual infrastructure.

The Capacity Planning (Hosts) dashboard shows the performance of hosts for the selected metric. Using the data provided you can provision your hosts and virtual machines with the correct amount of physical memory and CPU resources.

The Content Pack for VMware Dashboards and Reports uses VMware's key performance counters to determine the memory and CPU resource demands of the hosts.

Screenshot of capacity planning (hosts) dashboard.

Host Performance

You can generate a report to monitor the performance of hosts based on CPU or memory usage. In the Capacity Planning (Hosts) dashboard, create a search using the drop-down lists on the dashboard.

To show host performance, follow these steps.

  1. Select a time range for the search (for example, Last 24 hours).
  2. In the Show Hosts with drop-down list, select a key performance metric, max CPU usage or max memory usage, to base the search on. For example, max CPU usage.
  3. Define a usage percent for a resource (for example, 70%).
  4. Specify whether you want the search to include results that are higher or lower than the percent specified. In this example, select or higher.
  5. Define a percentage of time over which the resource is used (for example 5%).

A results table shows host performance for all hosts for which max_cpu_usage was 70% or higher more than 5% of the time.

Click a host in the results table to chart the individual host performance. The average and maximum usage for the performance category (mem or CPU) for the host is displayed in relation to the threshold you defined.

The following metrics are used to populate the dashboard.

Name Metric Description
max cpu usage cpu.average.usage.percent This is the ESXi host's average memory usage as a percent value.
max memory usage mem.average.usage.percent This is the ESXi host's average memory usage as a percent value.

Cluster Detail dashboard

On this dashboard you can see the details for a specific cluster over the time range selected.

You can:

  • Get a quick view of the state of the hosts in the cluster.
  • Identify the root cause of issues in the cluster.
  • Check how the cluster performs for key performance metrics.

Cluster Configuration and Status

On this panel get basic configuration information about the state of the cluster. You can see:

  • The status of the cluster.
  • The available and total processing power (in MHZ) for the cluster.
  • The available and total memory (in MB) for the cluster.
  • he total number of cores assigned to the cluster and the processing power of each (in MHZ).

Connected Datastores

Look at a list of datastores connected to the host systems in the cluster. Click the datastore name to drill down to the specific details for that datastore, shown on the Datastore Detail dashboard. You get visibility into the file types residing on that datastore. Using this information you can plan your storage requirements for the cluster.

Host System Members Information

Look at high-level information about the host systems in the cluster. You can see:

  • The total number of host.
  • A roll-up status of hosts that are in the normal, warning, and critical states for the thresholds defined.

To get more details for each hosts system, click on the value associated with the field. For example, click 23 for Total Hosts to display a table with details for all the host systems in the cluster.

Recent Tasks and Events

Look at recent tasks and events that have occurred on the cluster. This panel lists all completed tasks on the cluster. The task list includes tasks performed on the host systems, for example, you can see alarms that activate when there is a change status for a resource on a host system. Use this information to investigate the root cause of problems in your cluster. You can isolate problems down to the task that caused it.

Recent ESXi Log Errors

Look at the log files generated by VMware ESXi hosts in the cluster. ESXi host logs are written to the file system and provide information about system operational events.You can examine the log files in detail drilling down to system events that can identify particular issues in your environment.

Chart of performance data for a cluster

Look at this chart to see the performance of the cluster for a specific performance data type. Filter your result by selecting a performance metric and then by selecting the statistical operation on the data.

Datastore Detail dashboard

On the Datastore Detail dashboard, you can access information about the storage layer in your environment. Using this dashboard you can:

  • Monitor the most important performance metrics such as latency and IOPS for the connected datastore, at the filer and at the volume level.
  • Correlate virtual machine performance with storage performance (specifically NetApp storage).
  • Reduce the time it takes to identify a problem if storage performance degradation affects all of the hosts or some of the virtual machines on a particular datastore.

Display datastore details

Review the details for a specific datastore either by using the drop-down lists to select a specific datastore, or drill down from another dashboard in the app to automatically populate the dashboard.

Use the drop-down lists to select:

  • A virtual center.
  • A datastore.
  • A time range.

The panels in the dashboard populate with data about the datastore you selected.

Review the configuration and status of the datastore

On this panel you can get information about the state of the datastore, such as:

  • If the datastore is accessible.
  • The volume type, for example, an NFS volume.
  • The available space and total space, in GB, on the datastore.
  • The space provisioned, in GB, for a virtual machine, and the percent overprovisioned.
  • The path to the datastore and the associated URL.
  • The number of virtual machines on the datastore.

Get the Datastore Filer Latency rate

Use this panel to see whether storage latency is a contributing factor to reduced performance in your environment. Spikes in latency rates indicate that you need to investigate more.

Filer latency rates are measured by monitoring performance metrics that track average reads and writes to the filer. Measuring latency is important to prevent performance problems in the application layer.

The following search is used to populate the panel:

| tstats values(NetAppPerformance.System_Performance.sys_read_latency_average) as read_latency, values(NetAppPerformance.System_Performance.sys_write_latency_average) as write_latency from datamodel=NetApp_ONTAP groupby _time, host span=2m | search [search `SystemHostname($filer[0].Filer$)`] | timechart avg(read_latency) AS read_latency, avg(write_latency) AS write_latency | eval read_latency=read_latency/1000 | eval write_latency=write_latency/1000

Get the Datastore Filer IOPS rate

Use this panel to monitor filer IOPS if you are concerned about latency in your environment. You can get poor virtual machine performance if your virtual machines don't have enough I/O per second (IOPS), or network throughput.

The following search is used to populate the panel:

| tstats values(NetAppPerformance.System_Performance.read_ops_rate) as read_ops_rate, values(NetAppPerformance.System_Performance.write_ops_rate) as write_ops_rate, values(NetAppPerformance.System_Performance.total_ops_rate) as total_ops_rate from datamodel=NetApp_ONTAP groupby _time,host span=5m | search [search `SystemHostname($filer[0].Filer$)`] | timechart avg(read_ops_rate) as read_ops_rate, avg(write_ops_rate) as write_ops_rate, avg(total_ops_rate) as total_ops_rate

Get the Datastore Volume Latency rate

On this panel you can measure volume latency rates by monitoring performance metrics that track average reads and writes to the volume on the disk.

The following search is used to populate the panel:

`ontap-index` sourcetype=ontap:perf source=VolumePerfHandler host=$volume[0].Filer$ instance_name=$volume[0].Volume$ | timechart limit=5 first(eval(avg_latency_average/1000)) as avg_latency_average first(eval(other_latency_average/1000)) as other_latency_average first(eval(write_latency_average/1000)) as write_latency_average first(eval(read_latency_average/1000)) as read_latency_average by instance_name

Get the Datastore Volume IOPS rate

In this panel you can monitor volume IOPS if you are concerned about latency in your environment. You can get poor virtual machine performance if your virtual machines do not have enough I/O per second (IOPS).

The following search is used to populate the panel:

`ontap-index` sourcetype=ontap:perf source=VolumePerfHandler host=$volume[0].Filer$ instance_name=$volume[0].Volume$ | timechart limit=5 first(total_ops_rate) as total_ops_rate first(write_ops_rate) as write_ops_rate first(read_ops_rate) as read_ops_rate first(other_ops_rate) as other_ops_rate by instance_name

Correlate VMware data with NetApp ONTAP storage data

Issues in the storage layer can impact the performance of virtual machines in your environment. You can correlate issues in your VMware infrastructure with NetApp storage issues using the Datastore Detail dashboard. This correlation feature enables you to better troubleshoot problems in your infrastructure and identify where the problems exist between the VMware hosts and your NetApp ONTAP filers.

For example, if virtual machines on an NFS datastore named "ISO" in the Content Pack for VMware Dashboards and Reports cause a problem in your environment, you can drill down to the filer and the specific volume in the Content Pack for NetApp Data ONTAP Dashboards and Reports and look at the performance information for the datastore known in your VMware environment as "ISO".

Correlation requirements

To correlate VMware data with NetApp ONTAP data, you must have the following Content Packs installed in your environment:

  • Content Pack for VMware Dashboards and Reports
  • Content Pack for NetApp Data ONTAP Dashboards and Reports

The correlation feature enables you to drill down from a dashboard in the Content Pack for VMware Dashboards and Reports to the Content Pack for NetApp Data ONTAP Dashboards and Reports and get specific filer and volume performance information.

For more information about the installation and configuration of the apps, see their respective Installation and Configuration Guides, the Content Pack for VMware Dashboards and Reports Installation Guide and the Content Pack for NetApp Data ONTAP Dashboards and Reports Installation Guide manual.

Required sourcetypes

The following sourcetypes must be present for this dashboard to populate:

  • The ontap:volume and ontap:perf sourcetypes must be present to get information about the volumes in the NetApp ONTAP environment.
  • The vmware_inframon:inv:datastore sourcetype must be present to get information about the NFS volumes in the VMware environment.

Display filer volume level details

Drill down from the filer to the datastore level to see details for a specific filer volume.

To display volume level details:

  1. In the Datastore Filer Latency rate panel, click a filer name.
  2. The Filer View dashboard of the Splunk App for NetApp Data ONTAP is displayed.
  3. Look at the specific storage controllers that have an impact on the performance of your environment.

For information on this dashboard, see [Controller View] in the dashboard reference for the Content Pack for NetApp Data ONTAP Dashboards and Reports manual.

ESXi Hosts Task Overview dashboard

Use this dashboard to get insights into the state of your virtual environment.

You can:

  • Get a quick view of the state of your host system, getting visibility into the tasks performed on the hosts and the related virtual machines.
  • Identify the root cause of issues on the host. Look down the list of tasks to see if there are any anomalies in your environment.

Use the search bar and menu tree on the dashboard to select the hosts or virtual machines you want to display. The search bar allows you to make a single selection. The menu tree supports multiple selections of hosts and virtual machines.

You can filter the data displayed based on:

  • User: Search for a specific message relating to a user.
  • State: This is the error state.
  • Description: Enter a value in this field to create a results table listing the details for the hosts that have messages that match your search criteria. The search looks in the error messages returned in the syslog data for the word you entered.

The source type vmware_inframon:tasks has to be present for this dashboard to work correctly.

ESXi Log Browser dashboard

The ESXi Log Browser is a quick and easy way to look at ESX/i logs collected from the host systems. Configure the forwarding of syslog data to Content Pack for VMware Dashboards and Reports. browse the following log data:

  • vCenter server vpxa agent logs (vpxa.log). These logs contain communication information with vCenter Server and the Host Management hostd agent.
  • Syslog management service logs.
  • hostd management service logs (hostd.log). The logs include virtual machine and host Task and Events information, information related to communication between the vSphere Client and the vpxa agent, and they store information about SDK connections.

Use the drop-down lists on the dashboard to filter your search results.

  • Time range: The time range over which events are reported.
  • ESX/i: TA list of ESX/i hosts from which you are collecting syslog data. The default value is All.
  • Common Terms: Common terms that exist in ESX/i logs. This is a static list of options. HTTP and event are examples of common terms. The default value is Any.
  • Field/Value: Common field values extracted at index time from events. This is a static list of options. The default value is Any.
  • Error/Fault: Common errors of faults that appear in syslog data, classified into a single grouping. The default value is Any.
  • Managed Objects: A list of all objects managed by the vCenter Server. The default value is All.
  • API Related: TA list of all API related search terms that can appear in syslog data. The default value is All.
  • Component: A list of all services running on the the vCenter server. The default value is All.
  • Sublogger: A list of the log listener services installed. The default value is All.
  • Look for: Enter the term that you want to specifically search for in the logs.
  • Level: A logging level. This can be DEBUG, INFO, WARN, ERROR, or FATAL.

Home dashboard

The Home dashboard displays details about virtual machines and hosts that are in a critical state in your environment. This is the first place to look to see if there's any trouble in your environment.

To check that you are receiving data, click the gauges to go to the Proactive Monitoring dashboard and confirm the topology tree is built from your environment.

All of the panels in this dashboard (except for Recent Alarms) are driven by performance metrics.

Understanding the gauges

The first two panels in this dashboard report on the set of key metrics that enable you to monitor the health of the virtual machines and hosts in your environment.

As the value changes over time, the gauge marker changes position within this range. Gauges provide a dynamic visualization of saved searches.

Each of the gauges in the Virtual Machine Health panel and Host System Health panel are graphical representations of the entities (hosts and virtual machines) that are in critical states in your environment for the specified metrics. The gauges measure how your entire environment performs for the critical level. Each gauge displays a percentage (of the total number) of virtual machines and hosts that are in a critical state, over the time period specified, for the specific metric. This value is a numeric representation of the display on the gauge and is based on the same search used to drive the gauge. It displays the current result for that search and the display changes as the results of the search change. The numeric value is mapped against a range of colors. As the value changes over time, the gauge marker changes position within this range.

A gauge can be in one of these states:

  • Red: Virtual machines or hosts are in a critical state for the metric.
  • Orange: Virtual machines or hosts are in a warning state for the metric.
  • Green: Virtual machines or hosts are in a normal state for the metric.

Review the metrics used to populate the Gauge and Datastore panels:

Panel Indexed field Configured metrics in threshold .conf file with default threshold value
Virtual Machine - High CPU Usage vsphere.vm.cpu.usage Virtual Machine:

p_average_cpu_usage_percent

critical = 90 warning = 75

PercentHighCPUVm

critical = 75 warning = 50

Virtual Machine - High Mem Usage vsphere.vm.mem.usage Virtual Machine:

p_average_mem_usage_percent

critical = 90 warning = 75

PercentHighMemVm

critical = 75 warning = 50

Virtual Machine - High CPU Sum Ready Time vsphere.vm.cpu.ready Virtual Machine:

p_summation_cpu_ready_millisecond

critical = 2000 warning = 1000

PercentHighSumRdyVm

critical = 75 warning = 50

Host Systems - High Memory Ballooning vsphere.esxihost.mem.vmmemctl Host Systems:

p_average_mem_vmmemctl_kiloBytes

critical = 10 warning = 2

PercentHighSwapHosts

critical = 75 warning = 50

Host Systems - High Memory Swapping vsphere.esxihost.mem.llSwapUsed Host Systems:

p_average_mem_llSwapUsed_kiloBytes

critical = 5000 warning = 0

PercentHighBalloonHosts

critical = 75 warning = 50

Host Systems - High CPU Usage vsphere.esxihost.cpu.usage Host Systems:

p_average_cpu_usage_percent

critical = 90 warning = 75

PercentHighCPUHosts

critical = 75 warning = 50

Datastore Information Datastore:

RemainingCapacity_GB

critical = 50 warning = 100

To change the default threshold value for the defined threshold metrics follow these steps:

  1. Stop the Splunk server on the search head.
  2. Open or create a local copy of the sa_threshold.conf file in $SPLUNK_HOME/etc/apps/DA-ITSI-CP-vmware-dashboards/local.
  3. Change the critical/warning threshold value for selected metric and entity type(VirtualMachine/HostSystem/Datastore).
  4. Start the Splunk server on the search head.

In addition to specifying a percent value, each gauge can also display:

  • 0%: A gauge that displays 0% indicates that none of the virtual machines or hosts in your environment are in a critical state for that metric.
  • no data: A gauge displays this message when performance data is not collected from your environment and is not coming into Splunk.

Looking at the gauges you can identify if there are problems with hosts or virtual machines that need immediate attention in your environment. A performance metric for a virtual machine or for a host system can be in one of three states: normal, warning, or critical. The states are driven by the thresholds you set.

For example, in this dashboard, a gauge that shows a value of 0% for High CPU Usage indicates that none of the virtual machines in your environment are in a critical state for that metric. This means that of all the performance data that is collected for all of the virtual machines, none of the virtual machines in your environment have a performance metric that meets the critical threshold level set for it. Each of the metrics measured has default thresholds defined for them in the Content Pack for VMware Dashboards and Reports.

700px-Home.png

Virtual Machine Health

The gauges displayed in this panel are a measure of how your virtual machines perform for the critical level.

These key metrics, used to show the health of the virtual machines, drive the gauges in the Virtual Machine Health panel:

  • High CPU usage: The threshold for the metric average_cpu_usage_percent drives this gauge. This is the virtual machines's average cpu usages as a percent value.
  • High memory usage: The threshold for the metric average_mem_usage_percent drives this gauge. This is the average of the amount of memory the virtual machine uses, as a percent value.
  • High CPU Sum Ready time: The threshold for the metric summation_cpu_ready_millisecond drives this gauge. This metric is measured in milliseconds and it is a measure of how long a virtual machine has been waiting for processing time from the host. The virtual machine is ready, but it can't do anything as the host has not allocated any resources to it. Sometimes a virtual machine that has too many resources allocated to it does not get scheduled to run by the host and is left waiting.
  • Total VMs: This is a count of the total number of virtual machines in your environment. Click on the number for Total VMs to see more details about each of the virtual machines in your environment, such as the host system that it is on and the associated vCenter.
  • Total VM Migrations: This is the total number of virtual machines that migrated. Click on the number for Total VM Migrations get more details about the virtual machines that migrated in the last four hours. To see the virtual machines that migrated the most, you can re-order this list by "TotalMigrations".

Host System Health

The gauges displayed in this panel measure how your host systems perform for the critical level.

These key metrics, used to show the health of the host systems, drive the gauges in the Host System Health panel:

  • High Memory Ballooning: The threshold for the metric average_mem_vmmemctl_kiloBytes drives this gauge. This is the sum of all values from VMware's ballooning driver for all powered-on virtual machines. The host memory must be large enough to support the active memory of all virtual machines on the host. This number should be 0. Balloon drivers activate when memory is scarce. It's best not to have any ballooning activity.
  • High Memory swapping: The threshold for the metric average_mem_llSwapUsed_kiloBytes drives this gauge. This is the amount of memory from all virtual machine that has been swapped by the host. This is a host swapping memory and is always a sign of the host being in a stressed state. Whenever this threshold is triggered, the host has no memory, and cannot reclaim it from the ballooning driver. This number should be 0.
  • High CPU usage: The threshold for the metric average_cpu_usage_percent drives this gauge. This is the host systems average cpu usages as a percent value.
  • Total Hosts: This is a count of the total number of hosts in your environment. Click on the value displayed for Total Hosts to see more details about each individual host.

Datastore Information

Look at this panel to get information about all of the datastores in your environment. The data is measured in Mega bytes. (It is not a percentage value.) The indicator shows the amount of free space and the amount of storage committed.

You can quickly see if a datastore is close to capacity and in a critical state. Datastores can be in critical, warning, or normal operational states. If the app cannot gather sufficient information about a datastore then the datastore is represented in gray, indicating that the data for the datastore is unavailable or that the entity is not powered on.

Recent VMware Alarms

In this panel you can see events that occurred in your environment that triggered alarms. Alarms can be triggered for a number of reasons such as memory usage reaching a critical level for a virtual machine or cpu usage for a host reaching a critical level.

For example, click on an alarm for "virtual machine memory usage" to see the event that triggered it. The Virtual Machine detail page is displayed. You can now see details about the event that triggered the alarm.

The source type vmware_inframon:events drives the data that is displayed in this panel.

Host System Detail dashboard

On this dashboard, you can see the details for a specific host system over the time range selected. You can:

  • Get a quick view of the state of your host system.
  • Identify the root cause of issues on the host.
  • Check how the host performs for key performance metrics.

You can drill down to this dashboard from another dashboard to see host detail information, or from the app menu, select Proactive Monitoring > Host System Detail, and search for the specific host using the search bar.

Host Configuration and Status

On this panel get basic configuration information about the state of the specific host. You can see:

  • The status of the host.
  • The available and total processing power (in MHZ) for the host.
  • The available and total memory (in MB) for the host.
  • The name of the host. This is the same name that is displayed in the search bar on the dashboard.
  • The cluster to which it belongs, if it is configured as part of a cluster.
  • Specific manufacturer and model number for the host.
  • The hyperthreading status, active or none.
  • The resource details of the host. Having sufficient resources is important. The resources include the number of NICs, the number of CPU cores assigned to the host, processor information, and socket information, in addition to the memory and processing allocations.

Connected Datastores

This panel shows a list of datastores connected to the host. Click the datastore name to drill down to the specific details for that datastore, shown on the Datastore Detail dashboard. You get visibility into the file types residing on that datastore. Using this information you can plan your storage requirements for the host.

Virtual Machine Information

This panel displays high level information about the virtual machines that reside on this host. You can see:

  • The total number of virtual machines on the host.
  • The total number of virtual machines powered on and off.
  • The number of virtual machined that migrated off this host.
  • The number of virtual machined that migrated on to this host.

Select the value associated with each of the fields to see specific details for that field. For example, click 23 for Total VMs to display a table with details for all the virtual machines on the host.

Recent Tasks and Events

You can view recent tasks associated with the host and event that have occurred on the host. This panel lists all completed tasks on the host. The task list includes tasks performed on the virtual machines on the host. You can see alarms that activate when there was a change status for a resource, for example, "Alarm 'Virtual machine memory usage' on apps-vc200 changed from Yellow to Green".

Use this information to investigate the root cause of problems on your host. For example, if a host goes down, you can see if a particular task caused it. You can also check if the host is resourced correctly.

Recent ESXi Log Entries

On this panel get a quick look at log files generated by VMware ESXi hosts. ESXi host logs are written to the file system and provide information about system operational events.You can examine the log files in detail drilling down to system events that can identify particular issues in your environment.

Chart of performance data for a host

On this panel you can look at the host system at a very detailed level and control the charting of performance data for a specific host based upon the selections you make from the drop-down lists.

The chart shows the performance of the host for a specific performance data type, mapped against the critical and warning threshold selected for the metric. The chart is driven by performance metrics for the host.

Use the drop-down lists to filter your selection for charting the data. Select from the following:

  • The performance type: This is the type of performance data you want to measure.
  • Instance data: When instance level data collection is turned on, performance data is collected as specific instances of performance counters. If instance level data is turned on, this drop-down list is populated with an identifier or a number of identifiers derived from configuration information. For example, the name of a disk, virtual Ethernet adapter, or CPU core. If instance level data is not from your environment, then the drop-down list defaults to aggregated (aggregated data for all of the instances).
  • The performance metric to measure.
  • The statistical operation on the data (average, min, max). This determines the chart results.

The chart displays the critical and warning threshold levels set for the selected metric. The performance of the host in relation to this metric is charted. Check for spikes on the chart and investigate why they are happening.

Performance of Hosts and VMs dashboard

Use this dashboard to visually compare the performance statistics, for hosts and virtual machines, in your VMware vSphere® environment, based on a selected performance metric.

You can compare the performance statistics of:

  • A host on one VMware vCenter Server with another host on the same vCenter Server.
  • Multiple hosts in a vCenter Server with hosts on another vCenter Server.
  • One or more virtual machines with other virtual machines.

Panel description

On each of the panels on this dashboard, use the toggle buttons, the search box, and the drop-down lists to set your search criteria. The name of the selected host or virtual machine is displayed in the panel, and a chart shows the performance statistics for that host or virtual machine.

You can chart up to a maximum of 50 hosts or virtual machines and compare the performance statistics for each. To change the default limit, edit the value set for limitSelectionCount in the SOLNSelector module in the host_vm_perf view:

name="limitSelectionCount">50

To clear the chart, click on each of the listed entity names in the panel to remove them.

Field Description
host / vm toggle Use this toggle to select either host or vm.
  • Click host to chart the search results at the host level in your environment.
  • Click vm to chart the search results at the virtual machine level in your environment.
Search box
  • When host is selected, in the search box, enter the name of the host, for example, apps-esx-21. As you type your search, a filtered list of possible matches is displayed. This helps you to search an entity (virtual machine or host system) through virtual center, host, or cluster. To select all the entity matches shown in the results list, use the wildcard character "*" after the "/".
  • When you select vm, enter the name of a virtual machine, for example apps-21vm. A filtered list of predicted virtual machines is displayed as you enter your search. Select a virtual machine from the list. You can chart the performance of any number of virtual machines by making more selections.
Drop-down lists
  • Select a performance metric category from the list provided, for example, cpu.
  • Select a performance metric, for example, average_cpu_usage_percent.
  • Select a time range for the search.

Proactive Monitoring dashboard

Use the Proactive Monitoring dashboard to quickly troubleshoot your environment and get to the details to identify problems in your infrastructure. You can see how different entities in your environment perform for different performance metrics. Use this data to directly manage any performance concerns that you have in your IT environment (at scale) and to prevent bottlenecks and outages in other areas of the enterprise.

The Topology Tree

The main focus of the Proactive Monitoring dashboard is the topology tree, built from topology information from vCenter. The topology tree provides insight to the overall state of your virtual environment. The tree is sorted based on the count of critical entities in your environment, with the most critical entities shown on the left of the tree.

You can:

  • Change how you view the topology tree. You can display the topology from the host system or the virtual machine perspective.
  • Change the performance metric type displayed. The tree is redrawn to display your environment for the new metric.
  • Navigate around your environment expanding and reducing the view of your environment.
  • Drill down to the entity level to get a more detailed view of that entity.
  • Compare how entities perform for different metrics.

The data displayed in the topology map is performance metrics based on the data that the app collects and uses to monitor the performance of your environment. Note that in the Content Pack for VMware Dashboards and Reports, the performance metric name (for example, average_cpu_usage) and the value used to measure it (percent) are connected as shown by the display name for the metric (average_cpu_usage_percent).

Each node in the tree represents an entity in your environment. Environments, virtual centers, clusters, and hosts stack horizontally in the tree. Virtual machines are displayed in a vertical stacks underneath their parent host node, to the right of the anchor point. Each of the entities are sorted by criticality (red, yellow, green).

Proactive Monitoring.png

The severity levels displayed by each node are driven by the thresholds set for the metrics selected. You can change a metric for the displayed entities or change the entity and the tree updates and repopulates with the latest information (within seconds).

You can select how you want to view your environment. You can view the topology map down to the hosts system level or get a complete view down to the virtual machine level. The ability to pan across the topology map or zoom in to specific entities enables you to get the visibility you need to actively monitor your environment.

The color coding of the nodes on the topology tree provides a bottom up indication of the status of your environment. Nodes are colored red, yellow, or green indicating the level of criticality in the entity or in the child entities. This color coding gives you a quick status of the node. You can get more details when you hover over a node to display the associated tooltip.

You can compare the entities for selected metrics when you pin them on the pinboard. You can drill down on nodes in the topology tree to more detailed views of specific entities to find the root cause of problems in your environment.

To create a topology map using the drop-down lists:

  1. Select an entity type from the Entity dropdown: Virtual Machine or Host System.
  2. Select a Performance Type. This is the type of performance data (such as cpu, mem, disk, etc. upon which to base the performance measurement of your environment.
  3. Select a Metric. Each performance data type has a set of metrics associated with it.
  4. Select a time range over which you want to run the search.
  5. Click Submit to create the topology map.

The topology tree populates only if you have set values in the drop-down lists on the dashboard. These values power the searches that generate the topology map.

The topology tree doesn't function in real-time.

Nodes

A node represents a single entity in your VMware vSphere hierarchy. It contains references to its parents and children, threshold status, name, identifiers, etc. Nodes are used to show the overall state of the entity it represents (cluster, host, virtual machine) and are color coded to provide a quick view of the state of your environment. The nodes display green, yellow, or red depending on the state of the environment. Nodes at the virtual machine level are organized by criticality. Virtual machines that are in the most critical state appear higher in the hierarchy, while those in a healthier state appear lower on the hierarchy.

Nodes have a status associated with them. All leaf nodes show a single color, which is the status for that node, while parent nodes display a color indicating the highest level of criticality for the nodes in the environment below it. Parent nodes also display node status indicators. You can:

  • Hover on a node to display the tooltip for the node.
  • Click on a node to expand it and display the child nodes.
  • Pin a node to the dashboard so that you can compare the details of that node with other nodes.

Node status indicator.png

The node status indicator is a doughnut indicator that encompasses a node. Only nodes that have children (parent nodes) display this indicator. It provides a quick view into the status of your environment. The absence of an indicator indicates that the node doesn't have children and doesn't expand further. The node status indicator can be divided into three segments to show the state of the selected performance metric for the entities in the environment. A metric for an entity can be in one of four states - normal, warning, critical, or unknown/offline. Each segment of the three segment chart around the node indicates the portion of children nodes in each of the three status states (red, yellow, green). The color of the node itself (the color in the center) indicates the status of the largest group of entities in your environment.

Tooltips

A tooltip is displayed when you hover on a node in the topology map. Tooltips are displayed for specific entities (virtual machines, hosts, clusters) in your environment. They display data for that entity, the complete environment, and a branch of the hierarchy.

Using the tooltip you can:

  • See the state of the metric (in this example, summation_cpu_ready_millisecond) measured for the selected entity over time.
  • Pin the entity. This enables you to compare it (on the pinboard) to other entities in your environment.
  • Drill down to get detailed information on the entity.

Tooltip-Host.png

For example, if you hover over a virtual machine, the tooltip displays the following information:

  • The name of the virtual machine.
  • The the time range over which the data is mapped.
  • The metric used to measure the performance of the particular virtual machine.
  • A distribution stream chart that maps performance data distribution over time for a selected metric.
    • The white line on the tooltip represents the performance of the virtual machine or the average of all nodes in the branch mapped for the specific metric selected, over the specific time range.
    • The light grey line is the global median.
    • The light grey zone displays results within 1 standard deviation of the global median.
    • The dark grey zone displays results within 2 standard deviations of the global median.

Note: Host information is displayed in the tooltip when host is selected.

Pin an entity

Having the ability to compare data for different entities in your environment is very powerful. In the Content Pack for VMware Dashboards and Reports, you can organize and compare various parts of your environment for different performance metrics and different entities.

The pinboard in the Proactive Monitoring dashboard is used to store pinned entities in your environment. A pinned entity is one that you selected in the topology tree to save to the pinboard so that you can compare it with other entities. Pinned entities stay on the dashboard even when you change the entity and metric used to monitor the behavior of your environment. You can drill down on the entities within a pinned entity.

The pinboard is a collection of detailed views. When a parent node is pinned, detail information for it and the child entities is displayed in the detail pinned panel. When a leaf node is pinned, a detail pinned panel is displayed showing information only for that entity.

Note that the data displayed for pinned entities is not affected by changing the time range on the page. Pinned entities are not preserved upon reloading a page. Once a page reloads you must pin entities once again. You can delete the entity or minimize it. All other actions on the page have no effect on it.

To pin an entity:

  1. Hover over a node to display the tooltip for that node.
  2. Click the pin in the tooltip.

The entity is pinned on the pinboard and the detail pinned panel is displayed for the particular entity.

Virtual Center detail pinned panel When you pin a virtual center to the pinboard, detailed information about the virtual center is displayed in the detail pinned panel. This information includes the following:

  • A title bar showing the name of the virtual center and a link to navigate to details page (arrow).
  • The total number of hosts managed by the virtual center.
  • The total number of virtual machines on the hosts.
  • The number of clusters.
  • For each host, a sparkline chart is displayed that shows the event count trend for cpu performance for the hosts. Now you can easily compare systems and see patterns in your data that may have been invisible before. For example, if you monitor cpu performance (based on percentage usage) of the host systems in your environment, when you pin a virtual center (or cluster) to the pinboard, a sparkline chart is displayed that shows the event count trend for cpu performance for the hosts over the specified time period for the selected metric.

Cluster detail pinned panel When you pin a cluster to the pinboard, the following information is displayed in the detail pinned panel for the cluster:

  • A title bar that shows the name of the cluster and a link to navigate to details page (arrow).
  • AvgEffCpu_MHz: The total available CPU resources of all hosts within a cluster (in MHz).
  • AvgEffMem: The total amount of memory of all hosts in the cluster that can be used for virtual machine memory.
  • A list of all of the hosts in the cluster. The following is displayed for each host:
    • An indicator showing the current status of the host. The list of hosts is sorted by criticality, with the most critical shown at the top of the list.
    • The name of the host.
    • A sparkline chart that shows the event count trend for the host for the specific performance metric.

Host detail pinned panel When you pin a host system to the pinboard, detailed information about the host is displayed in the detail pinned panel. This information includes, but is not limited to, the following:

  • A title bar showing the host name and a link to navigate to details page (arrow).
  • The overall status of the host (green, yellow, red).
  • The manufacturer and model number of the host.
  • System specifications such as the number of NICs, processors, and sockets.
  • Memory and cpu usage of the host.
  • Information about the cores.
  • A chart showing the last 24 hours of processing load on the host system for the selected metric.

Virtual Machine detail pinned panel When you pin a virtual machine to the pinboard, the following information is displayed in the tooltip for the virtual machine:

  • A title bar: The tooltip title bar displays the virtual machine name and a link to navigate to the virtual machine details page (arrow).
  • Power State: This shows if the virtual machine is powered on.
  • numCPU: The number of vCPUs allocated to the virtual machine.
  • guestFullName: The full name of the guest operating system installed and running in the virtual machine.
  • toolsStatus: The status of VMTools, if it is installed.
  • numCoresPerSocket: The number of cores per virtual socket.
  • memorySizeMB: The amount of memory (in MB) allocated to the virtual machine.
  • cpuReservation: The guaranteed cpu (in MHz) allocated to the virtual machine.
  • memoryReservation: The guaranteed memory allocated to the virtual machine to ensure stable performance.
  • memSharesLevel: The memory allocation level for the virtual machine.
  • memSharesShares: The number of memory shares allocated to the virtual machine.
  • cpuSharesLevel: The cpu allocation level for the virtual machine.
  • cpuSharesShares: The number of cpu shares allocated to the virtual machine.
  • Performance chart: A graph showing the load on the virtual machine for the last 24 hour period. This is overlaid on a chart of the average load for all virtual machines on this host.

Task and Event Details dashboard

Use the Task and Event details dashboard to quickly and easily look at tasks and events that have occurred on the various entities in your environment.

You can filter results based on:

  • Specific tasks.
  • Users.
  • A specific message.
  • Entities in your environment, such as vCenter servers, hosts, virtual machines, and so on.

The source types vmware_inframon:events or vmware_inframon:tasks have to be present for this dashboard to work correctly.

Use the drop-down lists on the dashboard to filter your search results.

  • Time range: The time range over which events are reported.
  • Event Classification: This is a list of all events that you can review. The default value is All.
  • Virtual Center: Enter the name of a vCenter server.
  • Datacenter: Enter the name of a data center.
  • Cluster: Enter the name of a cluster.
  • Host: Enter the name of a host.
  • Virtual Machine: Enter the name of a Virtual Machine.
  • Username: Enter the name of a user.
  • Task: Enter a specific task.
  • Message: Enter a specific message relevant to a task or event.

vCenter Log Browser dashboard

The vCenter Log Browser is a quick and easy way to look at vCenter server logs.

You can browse the following log data:

  • Main vCenter diagnostic logs (vpxd).
  • Storage management service logs (sms logs).
  • vCenter web services logs (vws/tomcat/stat/cim-diag).

For this dashboard to work correctly, you have to have vclog data set up to forward to the Content Pack for VMware Dashboards and Reports. See Configure Splunk Add-on for VMware Metrics to collect vCenter Server log data in the Splunk Add-on for VMWare Metrics manual for detailed instructions.

Use the drop-down lists on the dashboard to filter your search results.

  • Time range: The time range over which events are reported.
  • vCenter: A list of vCenter servers from which you are collecting syslog data. The default value is All.
  • Look for: Enter the term that you want to specifically search for in the logs.
  • Level: A logging level. This can be DEBUG, INFO, WARN, ERROR, or FATAL. The default is ERROR.

These source types have to be present for the data to populate the panels:

  • vpxd: vmware:vclog:vpxd
  • sms: vmware:vclog:sms
  • vws/tomcat/stat/cim-diag: vmware:vclog:vws or vmware:vclog:stats or vmware:vclog:cim-diag or vmware:vclog:vim-tomcat-shared or vmware:vclog:tomcat

Virtual Machine Detail dashboard

On this dashboard, you can see the details for a specific virtual machine. Using this dashboard you can:

  1. Track virtual machines in your environment as they migrate across hosts.
  2. Identify the root cause of the issues.
  3. Check how the virtual machine performs for key performance metrics.
  4. Get insight into the granular virtualization layer data, which helps solve problems quickly.

Virtual Machine Configuration and Status

This panel provides basic configuration information about the state of your virtual machine. It displays:

  1. The name of the virtual machine.
  2. The operating system is installed on it.
  3. The state of the virtual machine, whether it is powered on or off.
  4. A status for VMTools, if VMTools is installed on it.
  5. The resource details of the virtual machine. Having sufficient resources is important to prevent a bottleneck in your system. The resources include:
    • The number of vCPUs (cores) assigned to the virtual machine, the memory allocation as well as the reservations and shares for each of these resources.
    • The cluster and the host to which it belongs. Drill down on the cluster or the host information to get to the detail dashboards for the selected entity.
    • High-level details about the datastore connected to the virtual machine and how much space the virtual machine is taking up on the datastore.

Drill down on the Datastore details

Click the datastore name to drill down to the specific details for that datastore, shown on the Datastore Detail dashboard. Click Click to Show to see the file types and file sizes for this virtual machine. You get visibility into the types of files that take up space on the datastore. This view enables you to plan your storage requirements. For example, if log files are taking up a lot of space, you can create a report that tells you the amount of space that log files are taking upon the datastore.

Configuration Changes

Look at this panel to see all of the configuration changes for the virtual machine. You can investigate the root cause of problems. For example, If a virtual machine goes down you can check if a scheduled task or an unscheduled task was the cause of the outage. You can also check resource allocations, such as how CPU or memory resources changed for the virtual machine.

Migrations

Look at this panel to see all of the migrations for the specific virtual machine. If the virtual machine migrated from one host to another over a period of time, the list of hosts is displayed. You can use the chart in the last panel to split migrations across hosts to get more detailed information.

Chart of performance data for a virtual machine

In this panel you can look at the virtual machine at a very detailed level. You can:

  • Control the charting of performance data for a specific virtual machine.
  • Show the performance of the virtual machine as it migrated across hosts.
  • See when the virtual machine was last on a host.

The chart shows the performance of the virtual machine for a metric of a specific performance data type, optionally split by host, mapped against the critical and warning threshold for the metric selected. The chart is driven by performance metrics for the virtual machine.

Use the drop-down lists to filter your selection for charting the data. Select from the following:

  • The performance type: This is the type of performance data you want to measure for the virtual machine.
  • Instance data: If instance level data is turned on, this drop-down list is populated with values representing instances. If instance level data is not being collected from your environment, then the menu defaults to aggregated (aggregated data for all of the instances).
  • The performance metric to measure.
  • The statistical operation on the data (average, min, max),

You can correlate the data with migration information for the virtual machine. Use the "split by" drop-down list to correlate the data by the physical host of the virtual machine (this is the physical host for a specific data point) You can see a history of where the virtual machine has been over a period of time (the hosts it resided on). You can also see when the virtual machine was last on a host.

To filter the data and split by host

  1. Select a performance type, such as cpu, from the drop-down list.
  2. Select a value for instance data from the options available, if you have instance level data turned on, or select aggregated.
  3. Select a metric for the performance type, such as average_cpu_usage_percent.
  4. Select none or host. Selecting host charts the data and splits it by host. If the virtual machine migrated, all of the hosts on which it resided are displayed in the chart. Splitting by host shows a history of what host it was on and when. Keep the value at none if you do not want to split the results
  5. Select how you want to view the data on the chart.

A chart is displayed showing the critical and warning threshold levels set for the selected metric. The performance of the virtual machine in relation to this metric is charted. If the virtual machine migrated from one host to others, then the results are split across the hosts. Check for spikes on the chart and investigate why they are happening.

Virtual Machine Snapshots dashboard

Use the Virtual Machine Snapshots dashboard to get information about snapshotting activities for virtual machines in your environment. Act on the data by consolidating, migrating, or deleting the snapshots.

On the Virtual Machine Snapshots dashboard, you can:

  • See the number of snapshots per virtual machine.
  • See the space used by the snapshots.
  • Track the usage of resources that snapshots consume.
  • Look at individual details about snapshot files such as file creation dates, file sizes, and so on.

The information displayed in each of the panels in the dashboard is determined by the selection you make in the drop-down lists.

Virtual machine snapshots (1).png

Snapshots present on VM panel

The Snapshots present on VM panel the resources consumed by snapshots on the datastore are tracked. Look at the information in this view to see whether snapshot behavior has an impact on your overall environment. You can decide whether you want to make changes to the snapshot activity in your environment.

Use the drop-down lists to select a Virtual Center and a time range over which you want to examine snapshot activity.

  • Virtual Center: The name of the Virtual Center.
  • Virtual Machine: The name of the virtual machine.
  • Datastore: The name of the datastore. Click on the datastore to drill down and see the snapshot details on it.
  • SnapshotFiles: The names of the files in the snapshot.
  • TotalFiles: The total number of snapshot files.
  • SnapshotSpace: The space used by vmsn (VMware snapshot) files. A vmsn file is used to store the exact state of the virtual machine when the snapshot was taken.
  • TotalSpace: A snapshot contains vmsn files along with other files. TotalSpace is the space used by vmsn files in addition to the space used by the following files:
    • vmsd files that store the metadata or structure of the snapshot tree.
    • vmdk files. Virtual Machine Disk files. These are descriptor files.
    • delta.vmdk file. This file contains the changes made on this snapshot in relation with the parents.

In the Snapshot Statistics for Datastore panel, use the drop-down lists to select a virtual center, a datastore, and a time range over which you want to examine snapshot activity.

  • Snapshot space used on disk: The chart displays the snapshot space (in bytes) used on the disk over the time range selected.
  • Number of Snapshots on datastore: The chart displays a count of the number of snapshots on the data store over the selected time range.
Last modified on 24 August, 2021
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This documentation applies to the following versions of Splunk® Content Packs for ITSI and IT Essentials Work: current


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