Splunk® Enterprise

Dashboards and Visualizations

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Token usage in dashboards

Tokens work similarly to programming language variables. A token points to information like a field value or search job start time. A token name works as a reference to that information. You can use tokens to capture information or to manage dashboard behavior.

There are several options for the information tokens capture, including:

  • Search job metadata
  • Form input values
  • Field values
  • Search terms

You can also use tokens to implement or manage dashboard behaviors. For example, you can implement dynamic drilldown operations using tokens or specify when to display a dashboard panel.

Overview of tokens

Token syntax for searches

Tokens capture and pass values in a dashboard. Token values can come from various sources, including form inputs and predefined token values for visualizations. Searches can access token values.

In a search, token name syntax uses $...$ delimiters. For example, if you define a form input token as field_tok, you can specify the token in a search as $field_tok$. Here is an example.

<search>
index=_internal source=*splunkd.log | stats count by $field_tok$
</search>

See Token filters for advanced syntax to access token values.

Generate token values

There are several ways to generate token values. These include:

  • Define tokens to capture input values for forms.
  • Define tokens to specify conditional actions, based on the value of the token.
  • Define tokens within a search string that use values based on previously defined tokens.
  • Splunk Enterprise defines token values that you can access.

Defined tokens include tokens for visualizations, for time inputs, and labels and values of form inputs.

Consume token values

There are many use cases for accessing the value of a token.

Use Case Description
Search events You can control conditional behaviors on the page or enrich displays with search metadata.
Form inputs The inputs to a form modify the data a visualization displays. Tokens defined with user inputs modify the search of the form.
Multiple time pickers in forms For forms with multiple time pickers, tokens indicate the tim picker to use for each visualization.
Dynamic drilldown When a user clicks a visualization in a dashboard, predefined tokens capture the value clicked for the drilldown operation.
Conditional display of dashboard elements Tokens set and unset conditions for the display of panels and their contents.
Pan and zoom chart controls to select an area in the chart Predefined tokens allow you to select a specific area for this behavior.

Tokens with SplunkJS Stack

If you are using SplunkJS Stack with JavaScript extensions, see Tokens and Data Binding on the Splunk Developer Portal to learn how to use tokens with JavaScript.

Define search tokens

You can set search tokens for a dashboard to display search job metadata or to control dashboard behavior.

There are many ways to use search tokens. Here are some example use cases:

  • Including a search result count in a visualization title.
  • If a search returns no results, run a different search or hide the panel.
  • Hide or show panels if a search fails.

There are also various advanced options for working with search tokens. Options include the following:

  • Show the time range of the search below the visualization element using HTML.
  • Build a custom HTML element and insert search results as tokens.
  • Define token values based on the result of token-specific eval expressions.

Search event elements and job properties

There are several search event handlers that you can use in Simple XML dashboards. Each handler offers different access to search information. See the following table to check whether job properties and/or results data are available for a handler.

Handler name Job properties? First results row?
<progress> Yes No
<preview> Yes Yes
<done> Yes No
<finalized> Yes Yes
<cancelled> No No
<error> No No
<fail> No No

For details on event handler elements, available properties, and usage examples, see Search event handlers.

Within a search event handler, you can access specific job properties and first row results data with tokens. For example, commonly used job metadata tokens include:

  • $job.earliestTime$: Initial job start time.
  • $job.latestTime$: Latest time recorded for the search job.
  • $job.resultCount$: Number of results a search job returned.
  • $job.runDuration$: Time, in seconds, for the search to complete.
  • $job.messages$: List of error and/or debug messages generated by the search job.


To include data from a field in the first search results row, use:

  • $result.<field-name>$

As an example, use $result.sourcetype$ to access the sourcetype field from the results.

To learn about more search job properties, see Search job properties in the Search Manual.

Search tokens for dynamic display example

Here is an example of the <search> element for a dashboard that hides a panel if no search results are returned.

   <search id="search_logic">
      <query>$index_switcher$ |  top sourcetype</query>
      <earliest>-60m@m</earliest>
      <latest>now</latest>

      <progress>
           <!-- match attribute for condition uses eval-like expression (see Splunk search language 'eval' command) -->
           <!-- logic: if resultCount is 0, then show a static html element, and hide the chart element -->
           <condition match="'job.resultCount' == 0">
               <set token="show_html">true</set>
           </condition>
           <condition>
               <unset token="show_html"/>
           </condition>
       </progress>
   </search>

For more examples, see the Splunk Dashboard Examples App.

Custom logic for dashboards

Add custom logic to a dashboard with the <condition match=" "> and <eval> elements.

For both <condition> and <eval> elements, all data available from an event as well as the submitted token model is available as a variable within the eval expression.

Token syntax

As of software version 6.4, you can use either $...$ delimiters or single quote delimiters for tokens in an <eval> or <condition match=" "> statement. For example, both of the following options are valid.

  • <condition match="$job.resultCount$ > 0">
  • <condition match="'job.resultCount' > 0">


Define conditional matching

Use the <condition match=" "> element to define conditional behavior. The following example controls a token value according to the result count job property.

<condition match=" $job.resultCount$ == 0">
    <set token="show_table_query">true</set>
</condition>

You can also use a dashboard eval expression to define a condition to match. Here is an example using <condition match=" "> to set a token value depending on whether the selected time range spans more than one day.

<condition match="relative_time(now(), earliest) - relative_time(now(), latest) > 86400">
    <!-- Selected time range spans more than a day, use summary search -->
    <set token="table_query">index=my_summary_index | timechart count</set>
</condition>

Use an eval expression for token filtering and formatting

You can use eval expression logic to define token filtering and formatting. For example, you can set a token value to the result of an eval expression.

Dashboard <eval> expression functionality

The dashboard eval expression has the same syntax and semantics as the eval expression syntax for SPL queries. Most of the same eval expression functionality is the same between the dashboard eval expression and the SPL version of eval. However, there are some important exceptions.

Unavailable dashboard eval expression functions

  • commands(X)
  • searchmatch(X)
  • exact(X)
  • Cryptographic hash functions:
       *md5(X)
       *sha1(X)
       *sha256(X)
       *sha512(X)
       *sigfig(X)
       *spath(X,"Y")

eval expression functions with different behavior for dashboards

  • relative_time(X,Y): Uses client time zone.
  • strftime(X,Y): Uses client time zone.
  • strptime(X,Y): Uses client time zone.


It is also important to note that regular expressions in dashboard eval expressions use the syntax and semantics of the JavaScript regular expression engine. This is not the same engine used for SPL eval expressions. If you are using regular expressions in search tokens, check that syntax and semantics match those for JavaScript.

To learn more about eval expression functions, see eval in the Search Reference.

Custom logic examples

You can use an eval expression in <condition> event handler elements. Here is an example.

<condition match="[eval expression]">
. . . [conditional actions] . . .
</condition>


You can also compute a token's value based on the result of an eval expression. Here is an example.

<eval token="new_token">[eval expression]</eval>

Define tokens for form inputs

All form inputs have a token attribute that defines a token for the user-selected value for the input. Form inputs also have child <prefix> and <suffix> elements that further modify the value of the token. For multiselect options, there are additional elements that can modify the value of the token. See Define tokens for multiselect inputs.

This code snippet defines a token for a drop-down list. The selected choice for the dropdown provides the value of the token.

    <input type="dropdown" token="sourcetype_tok">
      <label>Select a source type</label>
      <default>splunkd</default>
      <choice value="splunkd">splunkd</choice>
      <choice value="splunk_web_access">splunk_web_access</choice>
      <choice value="splunkd_ui_access">splunkd_ui_access</choice>
    </input>

See Form input example.

Define tokens for multiselect inputs

A multiselect input uses the <prefix>, <suffix>, <valuePrefix>, <valueSuffix>, and <delimiter> elements to build the multiselection search for the selected choices. The multiselection search, which is the value of the token for the input, ensures that the input passes all selected values to the search for the form.

The following code snippet shows how to build a value for the multiselect token. If a user selects both splunkd and splunk_web_access from the multiselect input, the token value is the following search fragment:

(sourcetype ="splunkd") OR (sourcetype ="splunk_web_access")

The search fragment derives from:

<prefix> + <valuePrefix> + [choice value] + <valueSuffix> + <suffix> + <delimiter> . . .
    (      sourcetype ="      splunkd              "            )         _OR_   
    <input type="multiselect" token="sourcetype_tok">
      <label>Select one or more source types</label>

      <choice value="splunk_web_access">splunk_web_access</choice>
      <choice value="splunkd">splunkd</choice>
      <choice value="splunk_ui_access">splunk_ui_access</choice>
      <choice value="splunkd_access">splunkd_access</choice>
      
      <!--      Build multi-selection search: 
        (sourcetype ="value1" OR sourcetype ="value2" OR ...)
      -->
      <prefix>(</prefix>
      <valuePrefix>sourcetype ="</valuePrefix>
      <valueSuffix>"</valueSuffix>
      <delimiter> OR </delimiter>
      <suffix>)</suffix>
      
    </input>

See Multiselect input example.

Define tokens for time inputs

If you have a form with panels that use different time pickers, use tokens for the time input to indicate the time picker to use for each panel. To access the earliest and latest values from a time picker, use the following modifiers to the token:

  • $timer_tok.earliest$
  • $timer_tok.latest$

A time input that does not define a token is global. The values selected from such a time picker applies to all visualizations that do not otherwise specify a time picker.

See Time input example.

Define tokens for conditional operations with form inputs

You can define tokens for conditional operations for form inputs. The value of the token changes according to the condition you specify. For example, you can modify searches or select different visualizations to display based on the conditional value of a token.

Conditional operations include:

  • Modify searches based on the token value.
  • Hide or display panels and the content of panels based on a condition.
  • Select a view to open based on a token value.

Conditional operations are available for form inputs and dynamic drilldown. Form inputs use various combinations of the following elements:

Element Description
<change> Container element for the conditions that you define.
<condition> Sets the condition based on the value of the input selection. In the Conditional input example, this is the value of the selected choice for the drop-down list.
<link> Specify a link to a destination based on a condition.
<set> Defines various values for a token. The <search> element in the dashboard consumes the value of this token.

In the Conditional input example, defines value for the token earliest_tok.

<unset> Removes a token that was previously set.

This is useful for conditional operations that depend on a token being set.

See the example at Conditional operations with form inputs.

Predefined tokens for accessing labels and values of form inputs

Splunk Enterprise provides predefined tokens to access the label and value of form inputs. Tokens are available for the following inputs:

  • check box
  • drop-down list
  • multiselect
  • radio buttons
Token Description
label Contains the specified name of a form input choice.
value Contains the value of a form input choice.

These tokens are useful to customize a search or place the label of the selected choice in a title or description of a panel or visualization.

See Access labels and values of form inputs.

Define tokens for dynamic drilldown

Predefined tokens for dynamic drilldown

Splunk Enterprise provides predefined tokens for dynamic drilldown. The predefined tokens capture values according to the location a user clicks in a visualization. See Dynamic drilldown in dashboards and forms.

The predefined tokens available and the values they capture, differ according to the type of visualization. The following table lists the predefined tokens for the table visualization. Drilldown event tokens in the Simple XML Reference lists all predefined tokens for dynamic drilldown.

Token Description
click.name Name of the leftmost field that appears in the table. This is always _time, if present.
click.value Value of the leftmost column in the row.
click.name2 Name of the column.
click.value2 Value of the column.
row.<fieldname> All field values for the table row, including those fields that are not displayed.
earliest/latest Time range of the table row, or if not applicable, the time range of the search.

The <link> element uses the value of the predefined token to link to a new view or web page. See Predefined tokens for accessing labels and values of form inputs. Predefined tokens are also useful in conditional operations using the <drilldown> element.

See Dynamic drilldown examples.

Define tokens for conditional operations with the <drilldown> element

Conditional operations include:

  • Set token values, based on a condition.
  • Select a value for multivalue fields in a visualization.
    A multivalue field is a field that appears more than once with different values.
  • Select a view to open based on a token value.
  • Hide or show panels based on conditions.

Conditional operations are available for both form inputs and conditional drilldown. Defining tokens for conditional drilldown uses various combinations of the following tags:

Element Description
<drilldown> Define link destinations for fields in a dashboard or form. You can also use with <condition> to set tokens for custom actions.
<condition> Limit the scope of drilldown actions to specific fields.
<selection> Use with the <set> element to set the time window for the pan and zoom features of charts.

Applies to charts of type area, column, or line.

See Chart controls and the <selection> entry in the Simple XML Reference.

<link> Specify a link to a destination for drilldown.
<set> Defines various values for a token.
<unset> Removes a token that was previously set.

Use with conditional operations that depend on a token being set.

Use the <set> element to define tokens

Use the <set> element to define tokens for conditional use. You can use the value of another token when defining a token with the <set> element. For example, the following code snippet defines the sourcetype_tok token. This token captures the value clicked from a <table> element for the field sourcetype.

        <drilldown>
          <condition field="sourcetype">
            <set token="sourcetype_tok">$click.value2$</set>
          </condition>
        </drilldown>

You can use the sourcetype_tok token in a search:

index=_internal sourcetype=$sourcetype_tok$ | timechart count by sourcetype

Use the <condition> element to select a value for multivalue fields in a visualization

Multivalue fields are fields that appear multiple times in an event and have a different value for each appearance. See Configure multivalue fields in the Knowledge Manager manual.

If you have a dashboard that displays multivalue fields, use the <condition> element to specify a drilldown location specific to the value of a clicked field. The following example links to different destinations based on the specific value for the field. The <link> element consumes different predefined tokens for each condition. See Dashboard linking to a multivalue field for the complete example.

      <drilldown>
         <condition field="badges">
           <link >
             /app/foursquare_vegas/vegas_badge_1?form.badge=$click.value2$
           </link>
         </condition>   
   
         <condition field="venue">
           <link>
             /app/foursquare_vegas/vegas_venue_1?form.venue=$row.venue$
           </link>
         </condition>   

         <condition field="links">
          <link>
            http://www.yelp.com/search?find_desc=$row.venue$&find_loc=Las+Vegas,+NV
          </link>
         </condition>   
      </drilldown>

Define tokens for pan and zoom chart controls

Splunk Enterprise uses predefined tokens to implement the zoom feature on a chart. Using the zoom feature, you can select a portion of a data series in a chart that opens in a separate chart. See Pan and zoom chart controls.

Set the values of the predefined tokens within a <selection> element that is a child element of a chart. Use the token values in the original chart to display a new chart that zooms to the selection.

Token Description
start
end
Captures the value of the x-axis at the beginning and end of a selection in a chart.

Valid only in the context of the chart. Assign the values to tokens that you define to access the values elsewhere in a dashboard.

start.<field>
end.<field>

Captures the values for the y-axis values for a selection. <field> represents a series displayed in the chart.

Valid only in the context of the chart. Assign the values to tokens that you define to access the values elsewhere in a dashboard.

See Pan and zoom chart controls for an example that shows how zoom to a selection in a time chart.

Syntax to consume tokens

As mentioned in Overview of token usage, use the $...$ delimiters to access the value of a token. For example, the following search for a visualization accesses the field_tok token. A form input previously defined the field_tok token:

index=_internal source=*splunkd.log | stats count by $field_tok$

Token filters

Token filters ensure that you correctly capture the value of a token.

Filter Description
Wrap value in quotes
$token_name|s$
Ensures that quotation marks surround the value referenced by the token. Escapes all quotation characters, ", within the quoted value.
HTML format
$token_name|h$
Ensures that the token value is valid for HTML formatting.

Token values for the <HTML> element use this filter by default.

URL format
$token_name|u$
Ensures that the token value is valid to use as a URL.

Token values for the <link> element use this filter by default.

The following code snippet uses the |s filter to place quotation marks around the value returned from a token:

<search>
  <query>
    index=_internal sourcetype=$sourcetype_tok|s$ | timechart count by sourcetype
   </query>
</search>

If the value of sourcetype_tok is access_combined, it builds the following search string:

index=_internal sourcetype="access_combined" | timechart count by sourcetype

Escape the $ token delimiter character

If you include static text that contains the $ character, use $$ to escape the token delimiter value.

Combine literal values with token values

You can combine literal values with the value returned from a token. Use with the <set> element to set conditional actions based on token values.

The following template combines the captured value from the predefined token, click.value, with static text. It places the value of NewToken in quotation marks.

<set token="NewToken">sourcetype=$click.value|s$</set>

If the value of click.value is access_combined, then the value of NewToken is the following search fragment:

sourcetype="access_combined"

You can use the prefix and suffix attributes to the <set> element to specify static text for a token value. The following example sets the value for NewToken. It is equivalent to the template example:

<set token="NewToken" prefix="sourcetype=&quot;" suffix="&quot;">
  $click.value$
</set>

Access tokens to show or hide user interface components

You can use token values to conditionally show or hide user interface components. The following elements contain the attributes depends and rejects. Use the <set> and <unset> elements to set the token values that these attributes consume.

Element
<input>
<row>
<panel>
<chart>
<event>
<html>
<map>
<single>
<table>

For example, show the <chart> element only when the showChart token has been set:

<chart depends="$showChart$">

Examples of token usage

Form input example

This example shows the basic usage of tokens in form inputs. It uses a drop-down list to select the source type for the time chart. See Define tokens for form inputs.

The <input> element defines the sourcetype_tok that is consumed by the search for the visualization.

Viz form example.png

<form>
  <label>Form example: source type time chart</label>
  <fieldset autorun="true" submitButton="false">
    <input type="dropdown" token="sourcetype_tok">
      <label>Select a source type</label>
      <default>splunkd</default>
      <choice value="splunkd">splunkd</choice>
      <choice value="splunk_web_access">splunk_web_access</choice>
      <choice value="splunkd_ui_access">splunkd_ui_access</choice>
    </input>
  </fieldset>
  <row>
    <panel>
      <chart>
        <search>
          <query>
            index = _internal sourcetype=$sourcetype_tok$ 
            | timechart count by sourcetype
          </query>
            <earliest>-7d</earliest>
            <latest>-0d</latest>
        </search>
      </chart>
    </panel>
  </row>
</form>

Multiselect input example

This example shows how to build a search string for a form input using static text and token values. This is useful for building multiselect options. See Define tokens for multiselect inputs.

The example uses the <prefix>, <suffix>, <valuePrefix>, <valueSuffix>, and <delimiter> elements to build the multiselect search string. When a user selects splunkd and splunk_web_access, it generates the following search string:

(sourcetype ="splunkd" OR sourcetype ="splunk_web_access")

Viz multiselect.png


<form>
  <label>Form with multiselect</label>
  <fieldset autoRun="false" submitButton="true">
    <html>
      <p>
        <strong>Multiselect choices</strong>
      </p>
    </html>
    <input type="multiselect" token="sourcetype_tok" searchWhenChanged="false">
      <label>Select one or more source types</label>
      <choice value="*">All</choice>
      <choice value="splunk_web_access">splunk_web_access</choice>
      <choice value="splunkd">splunkd</choice>
      <choice value="splunk_ui_access">splunk_ui_access</choice>
      <choice value="splunkd_access">splunkd_access</choice>
      
      <!--      Build multiselect search: 
        (sourcetype ="value1" OR sourcetype ="value2" OR ...)
      -->
      <prefix>(</prefix>
      <valuePrefix>sourcetype ="</valuePrefix>
      <valueSuffix>"</valueSuffix>
      <delimiter> OR </delimiter>
      <suffix>)</suffix>
      
    </input>
  </fieldset>
  <row>
    <panel>
      <title></title>
      <chart>
        <search>
          <query>index =_internal $sourcetype_tok$ | stats count by sourcetype</query>
          <earliest>-24h</earliest>
          <latest>now</latest>
        </search>
        <option name="charting.chart">line</option>
        <option name="charting.axisY.scale">log</option>
      </chart>
    </panel>
  </row>
</form>

Time input example

This example shows how to use both a global and local time picker in a form. It also shows how to access the predefined modifiers to a time input token. See Define tokens for time inputs.

The example shows a form with both a global time picker and local time picker. The <chart> element contains the local time picker and uses modifiers to the local_time_input_tok token to access the earliest and latest values.

Viz multiple timers.png

<form>

 <label>Form with multiple time pickers</label>
 <description></description>
 <fieldset submitButton="false">
   <input type="dropdown" token="source_tok" searchWhenChanged="true">
     <label>Select a source type</label>
     <choice value="*">All</choice>
     <search>
       <query>index=_internal | stats count by sourcetype</query>
       <earliest>-7d@h</earliest>
       <latest>now</latest>
     </search>
     <fieldForLabel>sourcetype</fieldForLabel>
     <fieldForValue>sourcetype</fieldForValue>
     <prefix>sourcetype="</prefix>
     <suffix>"</suffix>
     <default>splunkd</default>
   </input>
   
   <!-- Do not define token for global timer -->
   <input type="time" searchWhenChanged="true">
     <label>Select time range</label>
     <default>
       <earliest>-7d@h</earliest>
       <latest>now</latest>
     </default>
   </input>
 </fieldset>
 <row>
   <panel>
     <title>Global timer</title>
     <chart>
       <search>
         <query>index=_internal $source_tok$ | timechart count</query>
       </search>
     </chart>
   </panel>
   
   <panel>
     <title>Local timer</title>
     <!-- Define token for local timer -->    
     <input type="time" searchWhenChanged="true" token="local_time_input_tok">
       <label>Select time range</label>
       <default>
         <earliest>-24h@h</earliest>
         <latest>now</latest>
       </default>
     </input>
     <chart>
       <search>
         <query>
           index=_internal $source_tok$ | timechart count
         </query>
         
         <!-- Use modifiers to token for a timer -->
         <earliest>$local_time_input_tok.earliest$</earliest>
         <latest>$local_time_input_tok.latest$</latest>
       </search>
     </chart>
   </panel>
 </row>

</form>

Conditional operations with form inputs

This example shows how to use conditional operations with form inputs. See Define tokens for conditional operations with form inputs.

The example uses the <change>, <condition>, and <set> elements to conditionally set the label for the selected time and to set the earliest time token. The search consumes the earliest time token to set the bounds for the search. This example uses the label and value predefined tokens for input choices. See Predefined tokens for accessing labels and values of form inputs.

Viz change inputs.png

Note: All input elements, with the exception of the time input, require a token attribute to be present. In the example, the input element defines the token, period_tok. However, this token is never consumed by the search.
<form>
  <label>Use tokens with conditional input choices</label>
  <fieldset submitButton="false">
    <input type="radio" token="period_tok">
      <label>Select a time range</label>
      <choice value="-24h@h">Last 24 Hours</choice>
      <choice value="-7d@h">Last 7 Days</choice>
      <choice value="-30d@h">Last 30 Days</choice>
      <default>Last 24 Hours</default>

      <!-- set condition based on the label defined by <choice> -->
      <!-- Within each condition, specify a custom label for display -->
      <!-- Capture the selected value in the token, earliest_tok -->
      <change>
        <condition label="Last 24 Hours">
          <set token="date_label">Yesterday</set>
          <set token="earliest_tok">$value$</set>
        </condition>
        <condition label="Last 7 Days">
          <set token="date_label">Last week</set>
          <set token="earliest_tok">$value$</set>
        </condition>
        <condition label="Last 30 Days">
          <set token="date_label">Last month</set>
          <set token="earliest_tok">$value$</set>
        </condition>
      </change>
    </input>
  </fieldset>
  <row>
    <panel>
      <title>Conditional Inputs</title>
      <chart>

        <!-- Display selected label in the title -->
        <title>$date_label$</title>

        <search>
          <query>index = _internal | timechart count by sourcetype</query>
          <!-- use the value of earliest_tok -->
          <!-- to set the time range         -->
          <earliest>$earliest_tok$</earliest>
          <latest>now</latest>
        </search>

        <option name="charting.axisY.scale">log</option>
        <option name="charting.axisTitleX.text">Time periods</option>
        <option name="charting.axisTitleY.text">Events</option>
      </chart>
    </panel>
  </row>
</form>

Access labels and values of form inputs

This example shows how to use tokens to access the labels and values of form inputs. See Predefined tokens for accessing labels and values of form inputs.

The example uses the label of the selected radio button in the title of the visualization. It uses the value of the selected radio button to determine the bounds of the search.

Viz change inputs.png

<form>
  <label>Use tokens with input choices to capture input labels and values</label>
  <fieldset submitButton="false">
    <input type="radio" token="period_tok">
      <label>Select a time range</label>
      <choice value="-24h@h">Last 24 Hours</choice>
      <choice value="-7d@d">Last 7 Days</choice>
      <choice value="-30d@d">Last 30 Days</choice>
      <default>Last 24 Hours</default>

      <change>
          <!-- use predefined input tokens to set -->
          <!-- tokens for the selected label and value -->
          <set token="date_label">$label$</set>
          <set token="earliest_tok">$value$</set>
      </change>
      
    </input>
  </fieldset>
  
  <row>
    <panel>
      <title>Conditional Inputs</title>
      <chart>
        <!-- Display selected label in the title -->
        <title>Source Type by $date_label$</title>
        
        <search>
          <query>index = _internal | timechart count by sourcetype</query>
          <!-- use the value of earliest_tok -->
          <!-- to set the time range         -->
          <earliest>$earliest_tok$</earliest>
          <latest>now</latest>
        </search>
        
        <option name="charting.axisY.scale">log</option>
        <option name="charting.axisTitleX.text">Time period</option>
        <option name="charting.axisTitleY.text">Events</option>
      </chart>
    </panel>
  </row>
</form>
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This documentation applies to the following versions of Splunk® Enterprise: 6.4.0, 6.4.1, 6.4.2, 6.4.3, 6.4.4, 6.4.5, 6.4.6, 6.4.7, 6.4.8, 6.4.9, 6.4.10, 6.4.11


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