Docs » Available host and application monitors » Configure application receivers for languages » JMX

JMX πŸ”—

Description πŸ”—

The Splunk Distribution of OpenTelemetry Collector provides this integration as the jmx monitor via the Smart Agent Receiver.

Use this integration to run an arbitrary Groovy script to convert JMX MBeans fetched from a remote Java application to SignalFx data points. This is a more flexible alternative to the genericjmx monitor.

The following utility helpers are available to use in the Groovy script within the util variable that will be set in the script’s context:

  • util.queryJMX(String objectName): This helper will query the pre-configured JMX application for the given objectName, which can include wildcards. In any case, the return value will be a List of zero or more GroovyMBean objects, which are a convenience wrapper that Groovy provides to make accessing attributes on the MBean simple. See http://groovy-lang.org/jmx.html for more information about the GroovyMBean object. You can use the Groovy .first() method on the returned list to access the first MBean is you are only expecting one.

  • util.makeGauge(String name, double val, Map<String, String> dimensions): A convenience function to create a SignalFx gauge data point. This creates a DataPoint instance that can be fed to output.sendDatapoint[s]. This does not send the data point, only creates it.

  • util.makeCumulative(String name, double val, Map<String, String> dimensions): A convenience function to create a SignalFx cumulative counter data point. This creates a DataPoint instance that can be fed to output.sendDatapoint[s]. This does not send the data point, only creates it.

The output instance available in the script context is what is used to send data to SignalFx. It contains the following methods:

  • output.sendDatapoint(DataPoint dp): Emit the given data point to SignalFx. Use the util.make[Gauge|Cumulative] helpers to create the DataPoint instance.

  • output.sendDatapoints(List<DataPoint> dp): Emit the given data points to SignalFx. We recommend using the util.make[Gauge|Cumulative] helpers to create the DataPoint instance. It is slightly more efficient to send multiple data points at once, but this doesn’t matter that much unless you’re sending very high volumes of data.

Benefits πŸ”—

After you configure the integration, you can access these features:

  • View metrics. You can create your own custom dashboards, and most monitors provide built-in dashboards as well. For information about dashboards, see View dashboards in Observability Cloud.

  • View a data-driven visualization of the physical servers, virtual machines, AWS instances, and other resources in your environment that are visible to Infrastructure Monitoring. For information about navigators, see Splunk Infrastructure Monitoring navigators.

  • Access the Metric Finder and search for metrics sent by the monitor. For information, see Use the Metric Finder.

Installation πŸ”—

Follow these steps to deploy this integration:

  1. Deploy the Splunk Distribution of OpenTelemetry Collector to your host or container platform:

  2. Configure the monitor, as described in the Configuration section.

  3. Restart the Splunk Distribution of OpenTelemetry Collector.

Configuration πŸ”—

This monitor type is available in the Smart Agent Receiver, which is part of the Splunk Distribution of OpenTelemetry Collector. You can use existing Smart Agent monitors as OpenTelemetry Collector metric receivers with the Smart Agent Receiver.

This monitor type requires a properly configured environment on your system in which you’ve installed a functional Smart Agent release bundle. The Collector provides this bundle in the installation paths for x86_64/amd64.

To activate this monitor type in the Collector, add the following lines to your configuration (YAML) file:

Splunk Distribution of OpenTelemetry Collector πŸ”—

To activate this monitor in the Splunk Distribution of OpenTelemetry Collector, add the following to your agent configuration:

receivers:
  smartagent/jmx:
    type: jmx
    ...  # Additional config

To complete the monitor activation, you must also include the smartagent/jmx receiver item in a metrics pipeline. To do this, add the receiver item to the service > pipelines > metrics > receivers section of your configuration file. For example:

service:
  pipelines:
    metrics:
      receivers: [smartagent/jmx]

See configuration examples for specific use cases that show how the Splunk Distribution of OpenTelemetry Collector can integrate and complement existing environments.

Smart Agent πŸ”—

To activate this monitor in the Smart Agent, add the following to your agent configuration:

monitors:  # All monitor config goes under this key
 - type: jmx
   ...  # Additional config

See Smart Agent example configuration for an autogenerated example of a YAML configuration file, with default values where applicable.

Configuration settings πŸ”—

The following table shows the configuration options for this monitor:

Option

Required

Type

Description

host

no

string

Host will be filled in by auto-discovery if this monitor has a discovery rule.

port

no

integer

Port will be filled in by auto-discovery if this monitor has a discovery rule. (default: 0)

serviceURL

no

string

The service URL for the JMX RMI/JMXMP endpoint. If empty it will be filled in with values from host and port using a standard JMX RMI template: service:jmx:rmi:///jndi/rmi://<host>:<port>/jmxrmi. If overridden, host and port will have no effect. For JMXMP endpoint the service URL must be specified. The JMXMP endpoint URL format is service:jmx:jmxmp://<host>:<port>.

groovyScript

yes

string

A literal Groovy script that generates data points from JMX MBeans. See the top-level jmx monitor doc for more information on how to write this script. You can put the Groovy script in a separate file and refer to it here with ${include:/<my_path>/jmx.groovy}. For more information on using the include config, see https://github.com/signalfx/splunk-otel-collector/tree/main/internal/configsource/includeconfigsource. Or, you can put it straight in YAML by using the | block indicator.

username

no

string

Username for JMX authentication, if applicable.

password

no

string

Password for JMX authentication, if applicable.

keyStorePath

no

string

The key store path is required if client authentication is enabled on the target JVM.

keyStorePassword

no

string

The key store file password if required.

keyStoreType

no

string

The key store type. (default: jks)

trustStorePath

no

string

The trusted store path if the TLS profile is required.

trustStorePassword

no

string

The trust store file password if required.

jmxRemoteProfiles

no

string

Supported JMX remote profiles are TLS in combination with SASL profiles: SASL/PLAIN, SASL/DIGEST-MD5 and SASL/CRAM-MD5. Thus valid jmxRemoteProfiles values are: SASL/PLAIN, SASL/DIGEST-MD5, SASL/CRAM-MD5, TLS SASL/PLAIN, TLS SASL/DIGEST-MD5 and TLS SASL/CRAM-MD5.

realm

no

string

The realm is required by profile SASL/DIGEST-MD5.

The following is an example Groovy script that replicates some of the data presented by the Cassandra nodetool status utility:

// Query the JMX endpoint for a single MBean.
ss = util.queryJMX("org.apache.cassandra.db:type=StorageService").first()

// Copied and modified from https://github.com/apache/cassandra
def parseFileSize(String value) {
	if (!value.matches("\\d+(\\.\\d+)? (GiB|KiB|MiB|TiB|bytes)")) {
		throw new IllegalArgumentException(
			String.format("value %s is not a valid human-readable file size", value));
	}
	if (value.endsWith(" TiB")) {
		return Math.round(Double.valueOf(value.replace(" TiB", "")) * 1e12);
	}
	else if (value.endsWith(" GiB")) {
		return Math.round(Double.valueOf(value.replace(" GiB", "")) * 1e9);
	}
	else if (value.endsWith(" KiB")) {
		return Math.round(Double.valueOf(value.replace(" KiB", "")) * 1e3);
	}
	else if (value.endsWith(" MiB")) {
		return Math.round(Double.valueOf(value.replace(" MiB", "")) * 1e6);
	}
	else if (value.endsWith(" bytes")) {
		return Math.round(Double.valueOf(value.replace(" bytes", "")));
	}
	else {
		throw new IllegalStateException(String.format("FileUtils.parseFileSize() reached an illegal state parsing %s", value));
	}
}

localEndpoint = ss.HostIdToEndpoint.get(ss.LocalHostId)
dims = [host_id: ss.LocalHostId, cluster_name: ss.ClusterName]

output.sendDatapoints([
	// Equivalent of "Up/Down" in the `nodetool status` output.
	// 1 = Live; 0 = Dead; -1 = Unknown
	util.makeGauge(
		"cassandra.status",
		ss.LiveNodes.contains(localEndpoint) ? 1 : (ss.DeadNodes.contains(localEndpoint) ? 0 : -1),
		dims),

	util.makeGauge(
		"cassandra.state",
		ss.JoiningNodes.contains(localEndpoint) ? 3 : (ss.LeavingNodes.contains(localEndpoint) ? 2 : 1),
		dims),

	util.makeGauge(
		"cassandra.load",
		parseFileSize(ss.LoadString),
		dims),

	util.makeGauge(
		"cassandra.ownership",
		ss.Ownership.get(InetAddress.getByName(localEndpoint)),
		dims)
	])

Make sure that your script is carefully tested before using it to monitor a production JMX service. The script can do anything exposed via JMX, including writing attributes and running methods via JMX. In general, scripts should only read attributes, but nothing enforces that.

Metrics πŸ”—

There are no metrics available for this integration.

Get help πŸ”—

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